Reading Outside of School: How Much is Enough?

Reading Outside of School: How Much Is Enough?

We all know that the biggest readers are often the biggest achievers, so a daily regimen of reading is a must. Many parents wonder how much their children should be reading outside of school, however. While there’s no definitive answer to that question, there are some guidelines you can follow to ensure that your child is getting her daily dose of literature.

The Importance of Nursery Rhymes

The Importance of Nursery Rhymes – Reading Essentials #10

Who isn’t familiar with Jack and Jill tumbling down the hill, or Little Boy Blue falling asleep and letting his animals running amuck, or Little Miss Muffet getting scared by a spider? I remember reading nursery rhymes as a child from a big Mother Goose book that was very old, and is still packed away in the attic somewhere. When my daughters were young, they read from a more modern-looking book with larger print and more colorful illustrations. 
These stories have been around for hundreds of years, and while fun to chant (I can still recite many of them from memory), they also serve a very important purpose in your child’s reading development. Read on to find out why these old tales are still so important to share today.

Literacy Activities: Preschool to Kindergarten

Literacy Activities: Preschool to Kindergarten – Reading Essentials #9

Most parents of preschoolers and kindergarteners have starting thinking about how they can help their children get ready to read. Hopefully by the time your child is 3 or 4 years old, he has had plenty of exposure to books, nursery rhymes, songs, and the letters of the alphabet. Take a look at my last post, Literacy Activities: Toddler to Preschool, if your child has not yet had these experiences.
As your child becomes more comfortable with the sounds that letters make, you can begin to help her connect the letter-sounds into words….

Mom reads with small child

How to Support Reading Skills at Home

We all want to help our children succeed in school, and this includes promoting good literacy skills such as reading and writing. Although the two go hand in hand, reading is perhaps the most important skill a student can have. After all, good readers make good writers!
No matter where your child is in the process of learning to read or advancing his reading skills, there are things you can do at home to enhance his learning and give him the boost he needs to excel. Here are some tips to help you assist your emerging, beginning, or proficient reader develop the skills he needs in order to take reading to the next level.

4 Key Ways to Help Your Child Enjoy Reading

Literacy is arguably the most important skill a child can have, and any educator will tell you that reading is the best way for youngsters to acquire new vocabulary and even writing skills. But what if your child turns her nose up every time you initiate story-time or recommend a book? As you know, forcing the issue can often backfire, but there are some ways that you can gently nudge your child in the right direction and help her develop a love for reading over time.

Literacy Takes More Than Luck

March is a great month to reflect on how you promote reading at home or in the classroom. Promote? Yes, we have to continue to encourage youngsters to read! Reading is competing for attention against video games and phone apps. Reading development is paramount to literacy, and children don’t come hardwired for reading – they have to learn how to do it. And in order for them to learn, it has to be taught.

Beyond the ABCs - Red Apple Reading

Parents and Reading Readiness – Beyond the ABCs

I don’t think most parents have a clue how important they are to their child’s early reading success. Reading readiness begins from the moment your child is born – can you believe it? Children absorb and begin to learn language from birth, even when they are not yet communicating verbally. By the time children begin school, most of their neural pathways for letter sounds may already be set!